KBH Client Story

Kennebec Behavioral Health's (KBH’s) Outreach Program received a report of a man living in inhabitable conditions. When staff members went to find him, he was living in a two-axle camping trailer on a very remote piece of land without running water and no nearby neighbors. The client was on probation, which was the only living situation he had available.

Kennebec Behavioral Health’s (KBH’s) Outreach Program received a report of a man living in inhabitable conditions. When staff members went to find him, he was living in a two-axle camping trailer on a very remote piece of land without running water and no nearby neighbors. The client was on probation, which was the only living situation he had available. He was thankful he had a place to stay, but he had to walk a few miles just to get water, and getting food was even more challenging.

KBH’s case manager worked with him for several months to get him into an apartment. Finally, an apartment in Unity became available, and KBH was able to move him into the apartment. This case was a success on the surface, but as the client stayed in the apartment, he found himself wanting to be in his previous situation because, while it was difficult, it was familiar. He knew how to navigate the challenges he was up against, and living like everyone else was stressful for him.

KBH’s Homeless Outreach Program works with clients even after they move into sustainable housing to ensure there are supports within the home. This support was key for this client because it took him a long time to adjust to his new lifestyle. Those who have been homeless for extended periods view their homelessness as a culture and lifestyle. It can take time for them to learn a new way of living.

This client has been in the apartment in Unity for over a year now, and KBH is still providing support to ensure he’s in a good space.

On Key

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